Delaware Public Media

Pamela D'Angelo

Contributor
Pamela D'Angelo

The Atlantic blue crab, Chesapeake Bay’s signature crustacean, has been through tough times in the last 20 years. Some recent improvement has been credited to restrictions on harvesting females. Yet Virginia still allows the harvest of egg-bearing females, something Maryland banned back in 1917. The reasons why seem to be wrapped up in economics.

Pamela D'Angelo

Recently, we’ve reported on the issue of coastal erosion in the First State– how climate change, rising seas and coastal storms impact Delaware, the nation’s lowest lying state.  We’ve looked at the problems it creates not only for the shoreline, but for the state’s Inland Bays and marshes in places like the Prime Hook Wildlife Refuge – and how it could cause problems for threatened species that use them like the red knot.   We’ve also told you about new methods being used to combat the problem in Delaware, including something called living shorelines.

Delaware is not alone in fighting this battle and in this week’s Enlighten Me - as part of our new collaboration with WYPR in Baltimore, Virginia Public Radio and others – we bring you a look at how its playing out in elsewhere on the Delmarva Peninsula.

Contributor Pamela D’Angelo tells us that in Maryland some of the Chesapeake Bay’s pristine wildlife refuges are drowning, casualties of erosion and the rising waters caused by climate change.  And now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is using Superstorm Sandy money and the latest science there to restore and protect two of Maryland’s prized refuges – in ways similar to what we see here in the First State.