Delaware Public Media

Andrea Appleton

Andrea Appleton is a producer for Midday. She comes to WYPR with years of experience as a freelance journalist filing stories for newspapers, magazines, and public radio. She has reported on topics ranging from bull riding to bionic fish, with an emphasis on science.  She is also former senior editor of the Baltimore City Paper, and a graduate of the Columbia University School of Journalism.

She and her husband live in Baltimore with their two young sons.

  

Time for the next installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. In 2009, comedian Jim Meyer told the story of an unusual job he once had. Hint: it involves a crown and scepter. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com

Jermaine Bell says he found a power in art that he didn’t feel in words. After studying graphic design at the Community College of Baltimore County, and graduating from the Maryland College Institute of Art, Bell entered the world of advertising. Then a few years ago, he turned his sights on a different line of work: supporting Baltimore artists - particularly artists of color - and the institutions that showcase their work. Now Jermaine Bell has been awarded one of this year’s 10 Open Society Institute Baltimore fellowships. Each fellow will receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to fund a local project. The Open Society Institute is a nonprofit that supports efforts to address problems in Baltimore's underserved communities, from violence prevention to food access. You can find Jermaine Bell on Instagram and Twitter at @jtbeezwax.

Chrissy Ferrara tells the 2009 tale of her love affair with Starbucks. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com

Nearly a dozen cities across the country issue municipal identification cards. They’re meant for those who have trouble getting other forms of government-issued ID: Undocumented immigrants or the homeless, for example. But given how easy they are to obtain, how useful are such ID cards? It turns out that in some cities, banks, buses, and law enforcement accept municipal IDs. Could it happen in Baltimore? City Councilman Brandon Scott hopes so. He’s sponsoring legislation to create a municipal ID here.

Why Homeschool?

Nov 28, 2016

Fall is here and the school year is well under way. But some parents don’t have to worry about packing a lunch or getting their kids to the bus stop on time. They are homeschoolers, and nationwide, they’re a growing demographic. In Maryland, there are about 27,000 homeschooled kids. What motivates parents to homeschool? Is homeschooling possible in households with working parents? What are the benefits, and the challenges? 

Maryland has too many deer. They cause tens of thousands of car accidents every year and over-browsing by hungry deer damages native ecosystems. The state typically tries to keep the population down through hunting. But some animal-rights advocates believe wildlife managers should explore other methods. 

With commercial drones on the rise and the skies becoming more crowded, what are researchers doing to prevent mid-air collisions? That’s the focus of the recipient of this year’s Outstanding Young Engineer Award in Maryland; he’ll tell us about his research. 

Now another installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Today, on Veterans Day, Marine Corps veteran Rich Blake shares a 2010 story from the Iraq War and a moment that could have been his last. It has been edited for brevity. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast--all at stoopstorytelling.com

What it’s like to be a woman in the contemporary punk music scene? Producer Andrea Appleton speaks to two Baltimore musicians: Shawna Potter, frontwoman for the band War on Women, and Madi Shapiro, vocalist and guitarist for Wet Brain. Madi Shapiro also runs a feminist DIY music label based in Baltimore called "Girl Problem Records". On Friday, Girl Problem will release its third compilation, titled Justice. The record release show will feature War On Women, Rukut, No Way! and  two Baltimore hip hop acts, Toyomansi and Phizzals. The show will be at the 5th Dimension, 405 W. Franklin St. 

Time for another installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Annette March-Grier tells us what it was like to grow up in a funeral home, and how her unusual upbringing influenced her life. Her family opened Roberta’s House nine years ago as a community-based nonprofit that aims to address the grief of high-risk families and youth in Baltimore City. November is Children’s Grief Awareness Month. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast--all at stoopstorytelling.com

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