Delaware Public Media

The Green

3pm & 7pm Fridays, 2pm Sundays

Embracing the spirit of its name (The Green in Dover and the New Castle Green), The Green will provide an open-air meeting place for Delawareans to discuss events, consider issues and share ideas. This radio and online magazine will present the highest quality Delaware news and information. Through informed reporting, nuanced storytelling and in-depth interviews, The Green reaches past stereotypes and knee-jerk reactions to encourage a fuller, more robust discovery of Delaware, today.

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Delaware Public Media

While election season has been over for much of the country since November, Democrats and Republicans in the First State are batting in extra innings for control over the state Senate.

Lt. Gov. Bethany Hall-Long’s Middletown seat is up for grabs with three candidates vying for the chair.  Until it’s filled, the state Senate is deadlocked with 10 Republicans and 10 Democrats.  And its worth noting that the Democrats have held the legislature’s upper chamber for more than 40 years.

Our political reporter, James Dawson, reached out to each candidate for an interview. After multiple requests, Republican John Marino declined our invitation through his campaign manager.

So, we bring you our conversations with the other two candidates – Democrat Stephanie Hansen and Libertarian Joseph Lazendorfer.

Some Kent County voters head to the polls next month to fill a vacant Levy Court seat.  Two candidates are vying to replace Democrat Brad Eaby in the Second District, after Eaby decided to step down to take a job with the state. The special election to fill Eaby's seat is set for March 21.

Delaware Public Media’s James Morrison recently sat down with both candidates, Democrat Andrea Kreiner and Republican James Hosfelt to discuss the race and the issues they’re focused on. 

Kreiner was previously as policy advisor to former Gov. Ruth Minner, and currently owns and operates a sustainability-consulting firm in Dover.

Hosfelt currently sits on Dover City Council and is a former Dover police chief.

File photo courtesy of USDA.

The Delmarva Peninsula lies under the Atlantic Migratory flyway, a path waterfowl migrate through. As Europe deals with recent outbreaks of a severe strain of Avian Influenza, some local poultry growers worry that just one infected bird passing through the region could contaminate and kill whole flocks of chickens.

 


Crisfield, on Maryland’s lower Eastern Shore, is probably best known for the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake, a political schmooze fest of legendary proportions. But the town soon will have another claim to fame. It’s about to be the first municipality in the Delmarva region powered by a windmill.

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Before finding its permanent location in a onetime office park, the Odyssey Charter School embarked on a journey befitting its name.

In comparison, Academia Antonia Alonso’s move was just a short hop, but its relocation was dramatic – from a plush urban palace to the same suburban setting that Odyssey calls home.


Delaware Arts Alliance

The Trump administration has threatened to shake things up in Washington. Speculation abounds that entire government agencies could be on the chopping block, including the National Endowment for the Arts. 

Delaware Public Media’s Mark Arehart talked with Delaware Arts Alliance Executive Director Guillermina Gonzalez about what that could mean for the arts in the First State.


Courtesy of the Delaware Department of Agriculture

Poultry is big business in Delaware and issues surrounding it - ranging from the building of new mega-chicken houses to the environmental impact of the industry - are stories we often delve into.

But in the process of that reporting, we don’t often paint a picture of what the day-to-day life of a local poultry farmer is like.

So, this week, as she works on a related story, Delaware Public Media’s Katie Peikes takes us inside a local organic chicken house to get a better feel for its operations.


The phrase school-to-prison pipeline is used to explain a growing phenomenon in schools across America. Studies have shown that the more times a student faces in-school and out-of-school suspensions, the more likely they are to drop out of school, become incarcerated and get involved in violent crime – hence the name school-to-prison pipeline.

 

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